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OUR LATEST POSTS

5

I’m a strong believer that if you wait for that mythical perfect time to fish, you’ll never go out fishing.

It’s a daily part of my day to check the counts, but a down count doesn’t mean that I’m not going to go out. A bad count could mean any number of things. Maybe the conditions weren’t right, maybe the bait was bad, or maybe the captain took a chance that didn’t payoff.

I recently came across an article by Kirk Deeter in Field & Stream. Deeter seems to have a similar point of view as mine. He has about as much regard for the anglers at stocked lakes as I do about count chasers. In his article, Kirk shines a light on the fake fishing of overstocked lakes.

faketrout2_sarlAfter sitting in traffic on a freeway in Los Angeles the other day, I decided that LA freeways are similar to over-stocked trout rivers. Put too many fish in a river and everything gets plugged up, and everyone starts acting weird.

Yet I am amazed by the number of anglers who think that stocking trout is the key to “good fishing.”

I get it all the time. “Hey, have you ever heard of XYZ place near Denver, the fishing is just tremendous there.” Yeah, I’ve heard of it. And no, the fishing is not tremendous.

The fishing is really all about mutant triploid fish, planted in such great concentration that by simply dragging flies through a run, you are bound to eventually snag one in the face. There are a lot of places like that these days. Places where people go to pretend to be good anglers. And people will pay through the nose to do so. But those places have nothing to do with actually being a good angler.

Photos: FishingLakes.com

27

13698735-standard[1]Trail cameras allow you to “hunt” year round, keeping you in the know about what the deer in your hunting area are doing.

Prices have dropped as more and more companies offer products, and the motion activated devices are simple to set up and easy to operate.  So what are you waiting for?

Now, aside from learning the whereabouts of elusive local bucks, your trail cam serves another purpose. You can enter your pictures for weekly prizes and a grand prize that includes an all-expenses-paid hunting trip with the Drury Brothers. All of the prizes relate to deer hunting, and uploading your entries is easy. Actually, you can win prizes by just entering without a trail camera image. But bagging that special picture would give you extra bragging rights…

Check out all the details.

IMG_0760Soybeans, alfalfa, and other lush crops are a magnet to mid-summer deer; they lure those elusive bucks out into the fields during daylight hours, providing a rare opportunity to evaluate growing antlers and make plans for fall hunting stands.

This window won’t stay open long, so take advantage of buck visibility with a spotting scope or sharp pair of binoculars.

This video from GrowingDeer.tv also looks at a doe found dead and an evaluation of the electrified low-fence strategy to keep deer from newly growing food plots. Check it out:

45

Howard 4 093If you’re a waterfowl or upland bird hunter, you may want to make immediate plans for a great fall trip to North Dakota.

If you’ve never taken a Dakota safari, you’re in for a great hunting experience and a chance to see a part of the country that gets little tourist attention.

The ducks and pheasants aren’t there for the oil money, so you can count South Dakota as a best bet as well. Dakota bird hunts are known for warm, friendly hosts and huge flock numbers. An Eastern pheasant hunter will probably see a lifetime’s worth of roosters flush in a single day, and waterfowl flocks are tremendous.

Daniel Xu covers this story for OutdoorHub, and it’s all good news.

24

Practicing in challenging situations for that shot on an elusive big buck is always a great idea, although I doubt that many hunters will attach a zipline to their tree stand so they can swoop down like an eagle for a closer shot. Nonetheless, this video is very entertaining and will certainly expand your imagination for future practice sessions.

A slightly less dramatic practice method is to hang a plastic coffee can lid in front of a target backstop and let the wind direct the angles and movement. Sometimes the lid swings back and forth, but it mostly rotates so that you must wait for exactly the right moment to release. All you need is a piece of string and a plastic lid, and this low-tech tactic will teach you patience at the moment of truth.

Now, check out this fun and clever use of a zipline.

24

It’s a matter of some heated debate as to whether climate change is affecting water temperatures, or if it’s a cyclical kind of thing. One thing is for sure, though — fish are reacting to it.

I’ve written how a predicted El Niño event is affecting fishing in my home waters off Southern California. Apparently, something similar is happening on the East Coast. Summer flounder, aka fluke, have moved further north. Instead of the bulk of the population being concentrated off the North Carolina coast, they are now up in the New York/New Jersey area.

The migration has created a major battle between North Carolina-based commercial fishermen and New York-based sports anglers. Find out what’s at stake in this interesting read from Climate Central.

fluke_passionfortheseaThe summer flounder – one of the most sought-after catches on the U.S. East Coast – is stirring up a climate change battle as it glides through the sand and grasses at the bottom of a warming North Atlantic.

Also known as “fluke,” the flat, toothy fish is remarkable for its ability to change color to adapt to its surroundings, rendering it almost invisible to predators and prey.

Some scientists say in recent years the species has begun adapting in another way. As the Atlantic Ocean has warmed, they say, the fish have headed north.

The center of summer flounder population, recorded as far south as Virginia around 1970, is now off the New Jersey coast. Its migration has set the stage for battle between northern and southern East Coast states on how to share the business of harvesting this tasty, lean fish – valued at $30 million per year commercially and untold millions more for the recreational fishing industry.

Battle lines have been drawn over a fish that has staged a remarkable comeback from a population crash linked to overfishing in the late 1980s. But fluke has returned to a dramatically changed environment in the sea and on land.

On one side are southern states, most importantly, North Carolina, with a commercial fishing fleet pummeled in recent years by competition from cheap foreign seafood imports. North Carolina today gets the biggest slice of the East Coast fluke fishery, based on its 1980s history as the leader in summer flounder landings. It is eager to hold onto its summer flounder quota, even if that now means the commercial fleet motors to New Jersey and back to find fish.

Photos: Ginny Sanderson (top); Passion for the Sea (above)