Snow Machine Storage Tips

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Floridians may not be able to relate, but if you own a snow machine or any winter power equipment, these tips can save a world of problems when the snow falls next year. An hour spent today prepping your snow machine for off-season storage will save you a big headache — and potentially a pretty penny — next ice-fishing season. Before storing your Polaris or any snow machine, follow these simple preventative measures (presented in an Ice Force post) to prolong its life.

Start by cleaning, washing, and waxing the hood, side panels, chassis, and plastic parts. Wipe down remaining surfaces with a damp cloth. Clean and touch up with paint any rusted or previously painted surfaces. Remove any corrosive salt and acids from surfaces before beginning preservation with waxes and rust inhibitors (grease, oil or paint).  Store your Polaris in a dry garage or shed, out of direct sunlight, and covered with a fabric snowmobile cover. A plastic tarp may cause condensation to form and damage snowmobile components.

 Clutch And Drive System

Remove your Polaris’ drive belt and store it in a cool, dry place. Do not lubricate your clutch components, except the drive clutch shaft bushing, as outlined in the Master Repair Manual.

Engine Protection

Preventing rust and corrosion on precision engine parts during storage is vital to ensuring the longevity of your engine and fuel system.

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SOURCEIce Force
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Joe Byers
Joe Byers has more than 1,000 magazine articles in print and is currently a field editor with Whitetail Journal, Predator Xtreme, Whitetails Unlimited, Crossbow Revolution, and African Hunting Journal magazines. He’s spent the last three decades depicting the thrill of the chase and photographing the majesty of all things wild. Byers is a member of the Professional Outdoor Media Association and numerous other professional and conservation organizations.

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