Home Hunting Deer Hunting How to Get Permission to Hunt Private Land

How to Get Permission to Hunt Private Land

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Knocking on a stranger’s door takes courage and technique. Whether you’re asking permission to hunt a Western ranch, a Midwestern farm, or a suburban woodlot, the answer you get will depend heavily on your presentation. The old cliché “You never get a second chance to make a first impression” has never been more true than when asking permission to hunt. You are asking to use the landowner’s most valuable possession, and most proprietors will be cautious about the privilege. This post from the U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance offers several great tips to help you succeed:

Hunting season is just around the corner, and it is never too early to start preparing. Part of that preparation includes gaining permission to hunt on the private land you’ve been eyeing. But what is the best way to convince the landowner to allow you access?

Illinois 10PT Deer 12 277We have all been turned down for that hunting, fishing, or trapping spot for a multitude of reasons. With the private land base shrinking in some areas, it’s more important than ever to make a good first impression and build trust with a landowner from the first meeting.

So how do you gain the landowners trust? Hunters who hope to develop a relationship with private landowners can follow these basic steps to gain a positive and working relationship:

Do not show up on their doorstep in the early hours of the morning to ask for permission for that day – definitely not a good way to start your relationship. Pay a visit to their house many days before you plan to hunt to look them in the eye, shake their hand, and introduce yourself. First impressions are the best impressions, but you only get one shot at that.

Joe Byers has more than 1,000 magazine articles in print and is currently a field editor with Whitetail Journal, Predator Xtreme, Whitetails Unlimited, Crossbow Revolution, and African Hunting Journal magazines. He’s spent the last three decades depicting the thrill of the chase and photographing the majesty of all things wild. Byers is a member of the Professional Outdoor Media Association and numerous other professional and conservation organizations.